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Day 12 – Riola to Rocca di Vignola …the DOG

BEWARE of the dog watercolour painting by Leanne Talbot Nowell

Waiting in the pitch dark my ears tuned in for the slightest sound. But there was silence apart from a twitter of a night bird. I lay awake for a long time wondering if I should go and see if Giuseppe was ok, but he had locked the door when he left and I didn’t have a key. There was no phone connection and nobody else on the farm. The inner voice said it was probably just a ghost and it’s time to go to sleep now.

In the morning the sun was shining and there was no sign of blood. Only a majestic view of the mountains. Giuseppe had vanished but breakfast was waiting on the table. I ate it all before loading my panniers and riding down the mountain to the main road at Riola.

500 kms.


Believe it or not but that terribly steep road I went up to yesterday to the ill-fated Il mio Refugio, is to be mine again today. It’s necessary to cross over through Montese on the crest, and down into the parallel valley.

The area is famous for nine mineral springs, some of them salty. According to the information poster in town, the area was considered sacred since the bronze-age. Cattle farmers would come from all around to perform rituals at an ancient lake which has disappeared now.

Goats and sheep munched at the edge of the road as I slogged up the switchbacks. A big green snake slithered along next to my wheel. Cherry trees dripped with fruit. Roosters crowed.

It took all morning to traverse the mountain. A bit like a game of snakes and ladders. Going down the other side was beautiful and quick, and I felt thrilled to have made it across the Apennines and into the catchment of the Po Valley.

Farmers were selling fresh cherries along the roadside. There are two types Duroni are scarlet and a bit tart, compared to Ciliegie, the sweet dark red juicy type. I stopped and bought a celebratory bagful of ciliegie from a lady and her daughter at my grand total of 500 kilometers mark. They took my picture.

Lunch on the banks of the wide stoney river Panaro at ‘Antica Osteria Ponte Samone’ was excellent. That’s where I met a travelling man called Carlo. He had a tiny black puppy in a backpack and told me to go to Rocca di Vignola. So I did.

The road there was overrun with speeding trucks. Some rumbled dangerously close to my shoulder. At the medieval village of Vignola there is a fascinating castle (Rocca) and a lovely posh bed & breakfast & dinner & lunch at Civico 7. A cyclone was passing over so I stayed safely home in the solid stone house. Happily spent the rainy day painting and eating wonderful homemade food with my generous and attentive hosts Cristina and Valta.

The room bragged a fancy spa shower which took me a while to figure out. When you’re an older person and slightly blind like me, those showers with levers, taps and switches can leave you feeling quite exposed. I felt like a Caravaggio character lounging around on the artfully arranged antique furniture picking at bowls of fat juicy cherries and sweets.

Valter was born in this house. It is immaculately renovated and maintained. In the dark attic stands a row of twelve wooden barrels full of wine becoming balsamic vinegar. Every year the contents of each are moved to the following barrel, and the first barrel is filled with fresh wine, until by the time it reaches barrel twelve it has become a glossy black syrup. It is then bottled. Some of the bottles are way more than one hundred years old, made by the ancestors. It is sweet and utterly delicious. I was treated to their balsamico on slabs of Grana Padano cheese.

The farmers made a lot of noise blasting projectiles into the clouds to ‘open’ them so it doesn’t hail on the ripening cherries. Boom, boom all day and night.

Then something unexpected happened. I went downstairs to the garage to fetch something from the bike bag, when a monstrous black Doberman charged at me. He made no sound except for his ghastly nails scratching the cement driveway. Valter who happened to be sweeping nearby, shot over to intercept him, taking the full force of the hugely muscular body with the broom handle planted diagonally across his chest. I made a really fast dash up the steps to the safety of my room.

Some deep survival instinct tells you when an animal is about to kill or simply scare you off… this dog was not trying to scare me off.

I found out later that he usually lives in a cage behind a hedge. He has never been out on a street because he’s too big and vicious to handle. So if you go and stay with Valter and Christina, make sure you don’t wander around unexpectedly.

See the route.